Help me build a how-to-guide for the #elearningmanifesto principles


150x150xSerious-eLearning-Signatory-line5-150x150.png.pagespeed.ic.DXeP5kemTe (1)Four of our renounced thought leaders (Michael Allen, Julie Dirksen, Clark Quinn and Will Thalheimer) launched the serious eLearning manifesto at March 13. They believe that we should do a better job with eLearning and that we should create learning experiences that are effective, that improve performance and that live up to the expectations we all (should) have of eLearning. They wrote down 22 principles. If you apply them correctly, your eLearning will be up to standard.

This initiative is well received but when I speak to people about it I get two questions: “Great, but how do I use these principles” and “How do I convince my boss or client that we should apply them.” This sparked the idea to write a post on each of these principles, with my answer to these two questions on each principle. I will write a post each week over the next few months.

I do hope to get support from you. Please sent your ideas, comments, best practices and whatever you can think of to mail@kasperspiro.com or put a comment on this page on at the article. If it adds value I will include them in the posts. If you sent me something on a topic already covered I will update that post. I will publish all post separately at this blog, but this page will act as the main page for all posts. Over the next 22 weeks this list below will get more and more hyperlinks.

The 22 principles of the eLearning manifesto are:

  1. Do Not Assume that Learning is the Solution
  2. Do Not Assume that eLearning is the Answer
  3. Tie Learning to Performance Goals
  4. Target Improved Performance
  5. Provide Realistic Practice
  6. Enlist Authentic Contexts
  7. Provide Guidance and Feedback
  8. Provide Realistic Consequences
  9. Adapt to Learner Needs
  10. Motivate Meaningful Involvement
  11. Aim for Long-term Impact
  12. Use Interactivity to Prompt Deep Engagement
  13. Provide Support for Post-Training Follow-Through
  14. Diagnose Root Causes
  15. Use Performance Support
  16. Measure Effectiveness
  17. Iterate in Design, Development, and Deployment
  18. Support Performance Preparation
  19. Support Learning understanding with conceptual models
  20. Use Rich Examples and Counterexamples
  21. Enable Learners to Learn from Mistakes
  22. Respect Learners

 

Comments

  1. Kasper, it’s clear people *are* looking for how to get started, so I think this is a great idea. Look forward to seeing the results. And thanks!

Trackbacks

  1. […] Michael Allen, Julie Dirksen, Clark Quinn and Will Thalheimer launched the eLearning manifesto at March 13th. It is an attempt to raise the quality of e-Learning and I do support it. The manifesto …  […]

  2. […] Post 0: Help me build a how to guide for the elearningmanifesto principles […]

  3. […] her (and from her) but never attended a presentation by her. She is one of the instigators of the serious elearning manifesto. She didn’t disappoint me. She is one of the people that has to leave out a lot of stuff, […]

  4. […] In the midst of developing her model, she discovered yet another blog devoted to our community of practice, written by Kaspar Spiro. He has been working on assembling a collection of articles that describe how to implement each component of the Manifesto. Here is his call-out to our community to contribute: Help Me Build a How-To Guide for the eLearning Manifesto Principles […]

  5. […] the first post on this topic for the goals and other posts on the serious eLearning […]

  6. […] Four of our renounced thought leaders (Michael Allen, Julie Dirksen, Clark Quinn and Will Thalheimer) launched the serious eLearning manifesto at March 13. They believe that we should do a better j…  […]

  7. […] A How-To Guide on the Principles of the eLearning Manifesto: “Great, but how do I use these principles” and “How do I convince my boss or client that we should apply them.” This sparked the idea for Kasper Spiro to write a post on each of these principles, with his answer to these two questions on each principle. He has also written a few follow-up posts on this (and plans to do a few more). Be sure to check them out by following the links at the bottom of the post. […]

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